***We’ve been having trouble with our Fiesta Cultural submission form for events and artists.  If you have not been contacted yet about a recent submission, please resubmit or email us asap to ensure we received your form.  English – artwalk@lanearts.org; Spanish – nyx@lanearts.org***

En Español

Lane Arts Council is pleased to announce the 8th year of Fiesta Cultural! Lane County’s largest celebration of Latino/a/x/e arts, culture, and heritage, Fiesta Cultural features multicultural in person and digital events happening September through December in Lane County. 

Interested in participating?  Lane Arts Council is seeking additional events, projects, and programs from the community to add to the Fiesta Cultural calendar, as well as more Latino/a/x/e and indigenous artists to feature during Fiesta Cultural.

Submit an Event for Fiesta Cultural
Be a Fiesta Cultural Artist

FIESTA CULTURAL EVENTS & PROGRAMS


UPCOMING EVENTS


Salsa & Bachata Fridays
Every Friday, lesson at 9pm and open dancing at 10pm
Vet’s Club, 1626 Willamette St (upstairs), Eugene
$13 online/$15 at the door for first Fridays with live music
Website

Join Salseros Productions every Friday for some dancing! They start off with a beginner salsa and bachata lesson from 9-10pm and then dancing starts at 10pm. No previous experience or partner necessary to attend. The first Friday of the month features live music by Orquesta Descarga 54, a 12-piece salsa band.


Bachata Lesson and Latin Social with BUENAS VIBRAS Latin Dancing
Every Friday, 7:30-10pm, lesson at 7:30pm, open dancing at 8pm
Friendly Street Church, 2290 Friendly St, Eugene
$5 cover
Facebook

This new Friday series for social Latin dancing and bachata lessons are brought to you by the same team that brought you Bailamos’ Friday Night dances at the Riverfront this summer.  Join the Bachata lesson (all levels) taught by Dmitri and Megan from 7:30-8pm.  Then, DJ Eddie (Edgar) is in the house to spin the hottest salsa, bachata, and merengue music.


demARTS
Saturday, October 8, 2022, 11am-2pm
Siuslaw Public Library, 1460 9th St, Florence

FREE!

demARTS is a selection of demonstrations by artists showing their craft.  This demARTS features Latino/a/x/e artists as a part of Fiesta Cultural.
  • Charrería demo and talk by Antonio Huerta  |  11am-12pm
  • Leather workshop with Jessica Zapata – Participants will work with a piece of leather to complete a small wallet, learn basic cross-stitch sewing, patterning, and some basic vocabulary in Spanish. | 12-2pm
  • Screenprinting demos by VRGNZ (Valentina Gonzalez) | 11am-2pm

About the artists:

Antonio Huerta is a Charro, a practitioner of the Charreria tradition that dates to the 1500s when the Spanish brought horses and cattle to the Americas. The Charreria tradition includes horsemanship, roping, and cattle work. Antonio believes in the value of preserving, practicing, and passing on cultural traditions to younger generations as means to building community for families. Antonio’s demonstration and talk highlight some of the important aspects of the Charreria tradition in communities across Mexico and the United States.

Jessica Zapata, originally from Mexico, is an avid cultural manager and promoter, multidisciplinary teaching artist, mentor of arts and culture programs,  and a Spanish teacher.  She is the Founder and Artistic Director of Eugene Arte Latino (EAL), whose mission is to encourage and promote Latin American culture through bilingual workshops, artistic activities and cultural events, among other events, that contribute to the human and social development of community members. Since 2007, Zapata has helped connect Spanish-speaking artists with events, resources, exhibitions, and has facilitated an extensive link of different cultural manifestations between Mexico and various cities in the United States. Jessica also teaches bilingual art workshops in the community and at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Modern Art’s Art Club for Mothers.


VRGNZ (right) is a visual artist who’s work centers around social constructs and subversion by creating murals, immersive installations, and screenprinting. Her unique style can also be found on stickers, accessories, and apparel, fusing adorable imagery and bright colors with taboo language and concepts. Available at
www.vrgnz.com


Reception: Fiesta Cultural Art Exhibition in Florence
Saturday, October 8, 2-4pm
Florence Regional Arts Alliance, 120 Maple St, Florence
Free!

Join the reception to view work by

  • Handmade beaded jewelry from Bella Beads by Diana (right)
  • Paintings by David CP Placencia
  • Mixed media pieces using the Repujado style by Rosio Diaz
About the artists: 

Rosio Diaz, originally from Puerto Vallarta Mexico, has lived in Eugene for over 20 years. She states, “I love to make art that blends traditional and contemporary styles and images. As an immigrant, art that blends new and old, traditional and modern styles and different cultural influences speaks to me and my experiences growing up in Mexico and living here. For this show, the pieces I have created use the Repujado style common in Mexico. Repujado Art uses sheets of tin or copper where the design is pushed out from behind to make a raised image. The pieces are painted with patina or alcohol ink. I also do art with mixed media and recycled or repurposed items.”

David CP Placencia: “I am a Eugene based artist as well an art instructor and founder of WheelHaus Arts. My father, first of his family born in America, worked at his family’s carpet business. He stressed the importance of hard work and the pursuit of higher education. My mother, who had practiced in Florence, inspired me to be creative and passionate for art, from an early age. I utilize chaos into my artworks to create harmony and this reminds me to find beauty in everyday life that inspires my paintings. I am specifically curious about the visual connections found in nature with the imagery of microscopic subjects as well as the imagery of the northwest. The topics of my work vary but each is a study in how the foreground subject is intertwined with its background or environment. Instruction and mentorship of the next generation of artists has been integral to my art practice. I seek to connect with the community so I can better connect with my own individual practice.”

Diana is a Queer Latinx artist with Zapotec roots. She was born in Santa Cruz, CA, lived in Washington and currently resides in Oregon. They began beading in 2019 and launched their Instagram page in February 2020. Since then, she has felt endless love and support from everyone they’ve encountered. It’s been an amazing experience to be a part of this community and they hope to continue to grow as an artist and person. 


Why I Traveled 3,000 Miles to Solve a Weaving Puzzle
Wednesday, October 12, 6:30pm
Wildcraft Ciderworks (upstairs), 232 Lincoln St, Eugene
FREE

This is a travelogue about a day Jewel Murphy spent in a Mayan Mam village in the highlands of Guatemala. Join the adventure and “meet” Jewel’s guide and his extended family who taught her about their customs and traditions including their woven cloth. Find out why Jewel went there and how immigration and the return home figure into this story.


Día de los Muertos Artisan Crafts with Jessica Zapata Mendoza
Saturday, October 15, 1pm
Springfield Public Library,  225 5th St, Springfield
FREE!
Website (space is limited; registration recommended)

Make a Día de los Muertos artisan craft inspired by Mexican traditions with local artist Jessica Zapata Mendoza. Participants will have the opportunity to display their work in the Springfield History Museum’s Community Ofrenda/Altar. Open to teens and adults. Space is limited, register at wheremindsgrow.org/events.


Windfall Reading Series: Poet María Concepción Sámano Patiño
Tuesday, October 18, 6pm
Watch online live or later at http://bit.ly/WindfallOct2022
FREE!

Join Lane Literary Guild and Eugene Public Library for a livestream of the Windfall Reading Series, a monthly gathering highlighting local and regional writers. This month’s program is part of Lane Arts Council’s Fiesta Cultural.

María Concepción Sámano Patiño will read poems in the original Spanish from her latest collection “Winter in the Window,” joined by Vere McCarty who will present his English translations. The book is illustrated with Sámano’s own land- and town-scape photos.

Intimate, lyrical, existentialist, and rich in imagery, Sámano’s poetry has been widely published and honored with awards from the Instituo de Cultura Oregoniana (Institute of Spanish-Language Culture in Oregon) and the Oregon Poetry Association. Her previous Spanish-language poetry collections are “The Days of Yellow Light,” “Melusina or the Perennial Aroma of Carnations, and The Darkness of Origin,” and “The Body That Takes Me.”

Originally from Jaral del Progreso in rural Guanajuato, Mexico, Sámano Patiño now lives in Salem, where she is active with the Salem Poetry Project, directs the creative writing workshop Migranta for Mexican women, and works professionally as a recovery and mental health mentor and in literacy training. She is an activist with groups including Piñeros y Campesinos Unidos del Noroeste (PCUN, Oregon’s Farmworkers Union) and hosts a weekly program on Radio Poder. She describes herself as a “tireless traveler and seeker for meaning in this world and our existence.”

Vere McCarty shares, “My translating work with Concepción is made enjoyable by the quality of her poems. I start with her poesía and her English translation, then look for the expressions and rhythms that best fit her original ideas. We talk each line and stanza back and forth until it sounds accurate and lively.” In addition to his work as a translator, McCarty is a writer and songwriter.

More information: Eugene Public Library, eugene-or.gov/library, 541-682-5450


Saving the World One Textile at a Time – Slow Fashion and Textile Traditions of Southern Mexico
Wednesday, October 19, 6:30pm
Wildcraft Ciderworks (upstairs), 232 Lincoln St, Eugene
FREE

There was a time, over a thousand years ago, when some of the most valuable commodities in the hemisphere were cotton, salt, cacao, and feathers and much of this trade went through the Mixtec kingdom of Tututupec. Today the descendants of this once mighty kingdom that resisted Aztec domination, live in small villages just inland from the coast of Oaxaca. They practice the ancient ways of their ancestors with the men farming cotton organically and the women spinning it into thread and weaving cloth on the backstrap loom.  This talk includes a short film chronicling the recent revival of this ancient tradition and then a look at photos of the different ways people are working to preserve their craft and what it really means to support indigenous artisans. Textiles from 6 different communities will be highlighted.